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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Does commitment to rehabilitation influence clinical outcome of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty?

David R Marker1, Thorsten M Seyler2, Anil Bhave3, Michael G Zywiel1 and Michael A Mont1*

Author Affiliations

1 Center for Joint Preservation and Replacement, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA

3 Rehabilitation Services, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research 2010, 5:20  doi:10.1186/1749-799X-5-20

Published: 22 March 2010

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether compliance and rehabilitative efforts were predictors of early clinical outcome of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

Methods

A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect information from 147 resurfacing patients, who were operated on by a single surgeon, regarding their level of commitment to rehabilitation following surgery. Patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 24 to 90 months). Clinical outcomes and functional capabilities were assessed utilizing the Harris hip objective rating system, the SF-12 Health Survey, and an eleven-point satisfaction score. A linear regression analysis was used to determine whether there was any correlation between the rehabilitation commitment scores and any of the outcome measures, and a multivariate regression model was used to control for potentially confounding factors.

Results

Overall, an increased level of commitment to rehabilitation was positively correlated with each of the following outcome measures: SF-12 Mental Component Score, SF-12 Physical Component Score, Harris Hip score, and satisfaction scores. These correlations remained statistically significant in the multivariate regression model.

Conclusions

Patients who were more committed to their therapy after hip resurfacing returned to higher levels of functionality and were more satisfied following their surgery.